Agile Resolutions

Agile Resolutions

Most of us start the new year with the best of intentions. It's a new year! A clean slate! Anything is possible! Then usually around March we're whirling down shame spiral of broken resolutions. It seems that the excitement of a do-over gets people going so much that they overdo. They set unattainable goals and expect to quickly rid themselves of habits they've engaged in for a lifetime.

 

I'd like to suggest a different way to engage with resolutions: Make your resolutions agile. The agile methodology is a philosophy of sorts that's used in software development. In order to keep you from dozing, I'll keep the details relevant to resolutions not building software.

 

What I'm suggesting, is that you take the resolutions that you decided on for this year, and instead of setting a hard choice between "I'm a flipping rock star" and "I'm a total failure," you iterate on each resolution over time. So say one of your goals is to be active for an hour everyday. Try it for a couple weeks and see how it goes. Then assess what's working, what isn't working, and how you can adjust to make the next couple of weeks better. Maybe there are certain types of activities that are easier and more motivating for you, maybe an hour is only doable five days a week. Once you have that information, adjust your goal. Adding this kind of flexibility helps you stay on track and evolves your expectations. You may find that by next December, that you're closer to your goals than you thought you'd be or maybe you've even added new resolutions over the course of the year. The idea that January is the only appropriate time to make real changes is ridiculous but it is a good catalyst.

Lessons in Home Improvement

Lessons in Home Improvement

Coquito is Better Than Eggnog

Coquito is Better Than Eggnog