Reusable Fabric & Beeswax Wraps

Reusable Fabric & Beeswax Wraps

At some point on my journey to cut down on waste and chemicals in my life, I came across reusable food wraps online made out of fabric that seemed to be dipped in beeswax. The only thing is that they're super costly for any normal budget, like thirty-five bucks for a set of three! 

I good general rule for any postmodern homemaker: If you think you can make it yourself, you should - if nothing else, it'll be a fun project. Luckily for me, I happened to have both fabric and organic beeswax on hand. If you don't, I recommend Etsy for supplies

Here's what I did and what I learned along the way... 

Since I do a lot of sewing, I had lots of good fabric scraps that I opted to cut into squares - you can really cut to any shape or size to suit your needs. 

My original instinct for applying the beeswax was to heat a bowl of wax and dip each piece of fabric in it. This turned out to be an awful and messy plan that I aborted pretty quickly. My next plan was to dip a silicone brush into the bowl of melted wax and paint it on the fabric, but that wasn't ideal because the wax dries really fast and it's pretty time consuming to get full coverage. I finally went with laying my fabric on a baking sheet, sprinkling wax on it, and sticking it in the oven.

This idea seemed to have the most consensus from folks who have tried making these.

  • I preheated the oven to 350 and put fabric and wax on the pan in for 3 minutes and all the wax melted well. You have to be super careful not to spill wax in the oven (next time I'll use a pan with more of a lip).
  • Once I took the fabric out, I used a silicone brush to evenly distribute the wax on the fabric. I found having the bowl of hot wax handy was helpful for cases where I didn't have enough wax coverage. Mind the pan because the more of these you do, the less wax you'll need on top because it will build up in the pan.
  • After distributing the wax, I found it helpful to put the pan back in the oven for a minute or two for a quick second melt. 
  • I quickly took the fabric out of the pan and hung it on a line with clothes pins. Be careful as the fabric will be a little squirrel-y from the weight and might stick to itself and the wax will definitely get on your fingers.

They dry pretty quickly. After I took them down, I just used my pinking shears on the edges and voila! 

These are fantastic reusable alternatives to other methods of wrapping or covering your food. They seem to provide a seal that is something between plastic wrap and tinfoil. I'll still use mason jars or glass containers for an air-tight seal but I'm excited to use these for covering everything else and maybe wrapping my lunch sandwiches in. 

Let us know what you think! Have you tried this? 

 

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